Rohr Eye and Laser Center Rohr Eye and Laser Center

Eye Exams 101

In the world of health priorities, our eyes seem to be on the lower end of that spectrum. We focus mostly on our bodies, then our teeth, but making sure our eyes are as healthy as the rest of our body usually comes out as nothing more than a “I’ll keep an eye on it” (no pun intended). Some people put off a dentist appointment or doctor checkup so long that they have a subpar understanding of what exactly such an event entails. For eye appointments a lot of people only recall the machine that shoots a puff of air at your eye, but the entire process is good to understand before making that long overdue appointment.

 

Why are eye exams done?

                The reasoning for eye exams may be obvious: they are used to check the overall health of your eyes. But, the goal of an eye exam is to pinpoint and discover any issues your eyes may be developing at the earliest stage possible. The earlier an issue arises, the better the chance of treatment. It’s when somebody puts off an eye appointment for years that any issue that may be present most likely has advanced to stage an untreatable stage. Having regular eye exams prevents any issue from metastasizing too late.

 

When should I be making appointments?

                The relative age of the patient is a key deciding factor for making regular eye appointments. For example, newborns and toddlers will usually have their pediatrician look for the most common eye issues during regular checkups. Only when something is found is a proper eye exam conducted, even at that age. For children a little older it is important to have the eyes checked prior to starting elementary school, after which you can expect checkups every one to two years. For adults, the frequency depends on your age range.

 

What should I do before, during, and after?

                The steps to take when going through an eye exam may seem dauting but the reality is much simpler. For first timers, understanding your eye health history is beneficial to both you and the doctor conducting the exam (not unlike an appointment with a general practitioner). Keep a tally of any health issues you’ve had in the past that may or may not be affecting eye health. You can also take this time to talk to the doctor about LASIK if you know your vision could already be better.

The exam itself is generally short and simple, with machines being used to test visual acuity and sensitivity. When you think of the phrase “better, worse, or the same?”, this is when you’d be asked that question. Also, yes, this is when you’d have the puff of air shot into your eye, so mentally prepare for that.

After the exam you’ll typically get the results of your exam and any issues that may have been found, if any. If issues are found (for example: cataracts), preventative measures and possible surgery can be discussed, and if your vision isn’t as great as you’ve boasted for years, you can try on glasses and find a frame that best fits your style with your new prescription.

That’s it! Not as daunting as it may sound, but it really is something one should keep up with, especially if you want a glasses prescription that is up to date.

 

Rohr Eye & Laser Center offers the most advanced technology available to suit your lifestyle and visual needs.  As a leader in laser vision correction and cataract surgery, our goal is to help you achieve the best vision possible without glasses or contact lenses.  More information can be found online at https://michiganlasik.com.